Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Fish species Diversity on Model and Natural Reef Patches: Experimental Insular Biogeography

Manuel C. Molles, Jr.
Ecological Monographs
Vol. 48, No. 3 (Summer, 1978), pp. 289-305
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/2937232
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2937232
Page Count: 17
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Fish species Diversity on Model and Natural Reef Patches: Experimental Insular Biogeography
Preview not available

Abstract

Fish communities associated with model and natural reef patches were studied to determine the effects of heterogeneity, area, and isolation on the number of fish species in these systems. The effects of season and succession on the structure of these communities were also examined. Species turnover was estimated to determine if numbers of fish species on small reefs can be viewed as a balance between immigration and local extinction. Interspace size diversity, one facet of reef heterogeneity, was not positively correlated with the number of fish species on either model or natural reefs. In addition, interspace size diversity had no significant effects on species composition. In most of the cases examined reef height, another aspect of reef heterogeneity, was positively correlated with the number of fish species and species diversity, H', on natural reefs. Observations of selected fish species inhabiting model reefs support the hypothesis that vertical zonation is a means of resource partitioning in these fish communities. A negative correlation was found between reef isolation and number of fish species on patch reefs. This correlation was strongest during periods when fish population sizes were lowest. Season had more of an effect on the structure of fish communities on model reefs than did succession. Immigration and local extinction of fish species occurred on model reefs throughout the study. Patterns of immigration and extinction approximated the predictions of the MacArthur-Wilson equilibrium model of insular zoogeography when species turnover was highest.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
289
    289
  • Thumbnail: Page 
290
    290
  • Thumbnail: Page 
291
    291
  • Thumbnail: Page 
292
    292
  • Thumbnail: Page 
293
    293
  • Thumbnail: Page 
294
    294
  • Thumbnail: Page 
295
    295
  • Thumbnail: Page 
296
    296
  • Thumbnail: Page 
297
    297
  • Thumbnail: Page 
298
    298
  • Thumbnail: Page 
299
    299
  • Thumbnail: Page 
300
    300
  • Thumbnail: Page 
301
    301
  • Thumbnail: Page 
302
    302
  • Thumbnail: Page 
303
    303
  • Thumbnail: Page 
304
    304
  • Thumbnail: Page 
305
    305