Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Nature and Limits of the sub-Saharan African AIDS Epidemic: Evidence from Geographic and Other Patterns

John C. Caldwell and Pat Caldwell
Population and Development Review
Vol. 19, No. 4 (Dec., 1993), pp. 817-848
Published by: Population Council
DOI: 10.2307/2938417
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2938417
Page Count: 32
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($16.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Nature and Limits of the sub-Saharan African AIDS Epidemic: Evidence from Geographic and Other Patterns
Preview not available

Abstract

The majority of victims of the HIV/AIDS epidemic are found in sub-Saharan Africa. The fact that the African epidemic is almost entirely heterosexual in transmission and that pronounced regional differentials exist in its incidence allows a unique opportunity for studying the mechanisms whereby the epidemic has spread. The ecological and clinical evidence renders it virtually certain that the location of the major AIDS belt extending from Uganda to Zimbabwe has been determined by the lack of male circumcision in this area. This probably enhances the direct transmission of HIV and makes more likely the transmission of genital ulcer diseases, especially chancroid, which act as cofactors for HIV transmission. The epidemic will likely intensify in the areas where males are not circumcised, but elsewhere will largely remain restricted to high-risk groups, such as prostitutes and their regular clients. Beyond Africa, there may be a considerable epidemic risk in the non-Muslim (and hence non-circumcising) areas of Asia. Here much depends on the extent of nonmarital and commercial sexual activity, the level of intravenous drug use, and the extent to which genital ulcerating disease is contained.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
817
    817
  • Thumbnail: Page 
818
    818
  • Thumbnail: Page 
819
    819
  • Thumbnail: Page 
820
    820
  • Thumbnail: Page 
821
    821
  • Thumbnail: Page 
822
    822
  • Thumbnail: Page 
823
    823
  • Thumbnail: Page 
824
    824
  • Thumbnail: Page 
825
    825
  • Thumbnail: Page 
826
    826
  • Thumbnail: Page 
827
    827
  • Thumbnail: Page 
828
    828
  • Thumbnail: Page 
829
    829
  • Thumbnail: Page 
830
    830
  • Thumbnail: Page 
831
    831
  • Thumbnail: Page 
832
    832
  • Thumbnail: Page 
833
    833
  • Thumbnail: Page 
834
    834
  • Thumbnail: Page 
835
    835
  • Thumbnail: Page 
836
    836
  • Thumbnail: Page 
837
    837
  • Thumbnail: Page 
838
    838
  • Thumbnail: Page 
839
    839
  • Thumbnail: Page 
840
    840
  • Thumbnail: Page 
841
    841
  • Thumbnail: Page 
842
    842
  • Thumbnail: Page 
843
    843
  • Thumbnail: Page 
844
    844
  • Thumbnail: Page 
845
    845
  • Thumbnail: Page 
846
    846
  • Thumbnail: Page 
847
    847
  • Thumbnail: Page 
848
    848