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Contraceptive Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice in Russia during the 1980s

Andrej A. Popov, Adriaan Ph. Visser and Evert Ketting
Studies in Family Planning
Vol. 24, No. 4 (Jul. - Aug., 1993), pp. 227-235
Published by: Population Council
DOI: 10.2307/2939190
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2939190
Page Count: 9
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Contraceptive Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice in Russia during the 1980s
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Abstract

In the former Soviet Union, there was a lack of valid and reliable social research on knowledge, attitudes, and practice of contraception. The few available studies have not been published outside the Soviet Union. This article reviews five surveys that were conducted in Moscow and two other cities (Saratov and Tartu) during the period 1976-84. In addition, some data from a large-scale survey conducted in 1990 and covering the entire former Soviet Union are presented. The surveys indicate that the rhythm method, condoms, vaginal douches, and withdrawal were the main contraceptive methods used; only 1 to 3 percent of the women interviewed were using oral contraceptives, and about 10 percent used intrauterine devices. The low prevalence of use of reliable modern methods may explain the high incidence of induced abortion in Russia. The chronic unavailability of reliable contraceptives is one of the main factors of poor family planning. Lack of knowledge and negative opinions about modern contraception also play an important role. Some possibilities for improving the family planning situation in Russia are discussed.

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