Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Total Institution and Self-Mortification

Madeline Karmel
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 10, No. 2 (Jun., 1969), pp. 134-141
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2948361
Page Count: 8
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Total Institution and Self-Mortification
Preview not available

Abstract

The general concern of this study was to see if an "inmate" in a total institution undergoes a process of self-mortification. The specific concern of this study was to see if self-mortification occurs in mental patients in mental hospitals. A panel sample of 50 patients was used. Self-mortification was interpreted to mean a loss in self-esteem and a loss of social identity. The Rosenberg-Guttman scale of self-esteem was used to measure self-esteem, and the Kuhn-McPartland Twenty Statements Test was used to measure social identity. Findings showed that self-mortification did not occur: there was a slight gain in self-esteem and social identity. Changes in depressive affect, as measured by the Rosenberg-Guttman scale of depressive affect, was used to help validate the findings.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
134
    134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136
  • Thumbnail: Page 
137
    137
  • Thumbnail: Page 
138
    138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
139
    139
  • Thumbnail: Page 
140
    140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
141
    141