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Determinants of Medical Care Utilization: The Use of the Telephone for Reporting Symptoms

Clyde R. Pope, Samuel S. Yoshioka and Merwyn R. Greenlick
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Vol. 12, No. 2 (Jun., 1971), pp. 155-162
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2948523
Page Count: 8
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Determinants of Medical Care Utilization: The Use of the Telephone for Reporting Symptoms
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Abstract

This preliminary report is based on a study in progress for more than two years that seeks to identify significant determinants of medical-care utilization within a particular medical care system--The Oregon Region of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan. The particular focus is on telephone utilization for the reporting of symptoms. The data presented here relate social and demographic characteristics of Plan members to telephone utilization and is a limited test of the hypothesis that more cosmopolitan persons with a more scientific health orientation are more likely to utilize the telephone than less cosmopolitan persons with a less scientific health orientation.

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