Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

From the Group to the Individual: What Can be Learned from Migratory Behaviour

Daniel Courgeau
Population: An English Selection
Vol. 7 (1995), pp. 145-162
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2949061
Page Count: 18
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
From the Group to the Individual: What Can be Learned from Migratory Behaviour
Preview not available

Abstract

By taking the analysis of population renewal as subject of study, demography has deliberately positioned itself in a context that privileges the analysis of aggregate values: the `stock' of individuals is modified both in terms of volume and structure by the `stream' of births, deaths and all the other events which intervene in the movements of populations. Understanding these streams involves dealing with behaviour patterns which enable the individual to emerge from under the mass of statistics: the increasing use made of data from surveys based on biographical reconstitutions reveals more clearly than ever the existence of a microdemography alongside, or in complement to, a macrodemography. This dual aspect is not specific to demography and, in fact, affects all of the social sciences. Mark Blaug, for example, when referring to the coexistence of a microeconomy and a macroeconomy, underlines the fact that this creates "a kind of intellectual schizophrenia in which the techniques of either approach do not entirely cover the domain of the other. This situation is far from satisfactory and economists have been trying to bridge the gap between the consumer and the function of global consumption or between the investor and the factors involved in investment aggregates. The bridging of this gap, however, is only partially completed and the economics student must be prepared to use two different tool boxes". In this paper, Daniel Courgeau brings his contribution to this bridge-building by drawing a parallel between the analysis of individual data and aggregate data concerning migrations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
145
    145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[146]
    [146]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162