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Smoking, Lung Function, And Body Weight

B. Nemery, N. E. Moavero, L. Brasseur and D. C. Stanescu
British Medical Journal (Clinical Research Edition)
Vol. 286, No. 6361 (Jan. 22, 1983), pp. 249-251
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/29509427
Page Count: 3
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Smoking, Lung Function, And Body Weight
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Abstract

In a cross-sectional study of steelworkers aged 45-55 years, smokers (n=105; mean weight 76.1 kg) were found to weigh significantly less than non-smokers (n=54; 81.6 kg) and ex-smokers (n=51; 82.6 kg). The lower weight of smokers was attributable to a group with airflow obstruction (n=37; forced expiratory volume in one second/vital capacity (FEV₁/VC) <66%), who weighed less (4.8 kg; p<0.05) than smokers with normal FEV₁/VC (n=68). In smokers, but not in ex-smokers or nonsmokers, body mass index and FEV₁/VC ratio were closely related (r=0.34; p<0.001). This association was apparently not due to an effect of body weight on lung function. Weight loss in smokers may be the consequence of impaired lung function or reflect the effect of cigarette smoking on both the respiratory tract and metabolism in susceptible subjects.

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