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JOYCE AND THE EMPIRE: SOME THOUGHTS ON "FINNEGANS WAKE"

JOHN C. SHERWOOD
Studies in the Novel
Vol. 1, No. 3 (fall 1969), pp. 357-363
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/29531344
Page Count: 7
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JOYCE AND THE EMPIRE: SOME THOUGHTS ON "FINNEGANS WAKE"
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Abstract

Although Finnegans Wake has sometimes been regarded as a satire on England and the idea of Empire, the actual allusions to characters and episodes from British history do not seem to exhibit any pattern of hostility either in the selection or the manner of treatment. Further, the characters and episodes are normally blended archetypally with characters and episodes from other times and places, and with the Earwicker-Porters and the events of their family life. This constant universalizing of persons and events effectively excludes the idea of a satire on particular men or institutions. (JCS)

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