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The Use of Condoms with Other Contraceptive Methods Among Young Men and Women

John S. Santelli, Charles W. Warren, Richard Lowry, Ellen Sogolow, Janet Collins, Laura Kann, Rachel B. Kaufmann and David D.Celentano
Family Planning Perspectives
Vol. 29, No. 6 (Nov. - Dec., 1997), pp. 261-267
Published by: Guttmacher Institute
DOI: 10.2307/2953414
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2953414
Page Count: 8
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The Use of Condoms with Other Contraceptive Methods Among Young Men and Women
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Abstract

In a nationally representative sample of sexually experienced youths aged 14-22, 37% of young women and 52% of young men said the condom was the primary method used to prevent pregnancy at last intercourse. (An additional 8% and 7%, respectively, said they used a condom at last intercourse; much of this represents dual use.) Condom use at last intercourse was reported by 25% of young men whose partner was using the pill. Significant independent predictors of condom use with the pill among men included younger age, black race, engaging in fewer nonsexual risk behaviors and having received instruction about HIV in school. Among young women, 21% of those relying on the pill reported also using a condom at last intercourse. For women, independent predictors of dual use included younger age, black race, older age at first sex, fewer nonsexual risk behaviors, having no partners in the previous three months and having talked to parents or other adult relatives about HIV.

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