Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Attitudes Toward Sexual Responsibility and Parenting: An Exploratory Study of Young Urban Males

Mira Gohel, James J. Diamond and Christopher V. Chambers
Family Planning Perspectives
Vol. 29, No. 6 (Nov. - Dec., 1997), pp. 280-283
Published by: Guttmacher Institute
DOI: 10.2307/2953418
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2953418
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($29.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Attitudes Toward Sexual Responsibility and Parenting: An Exploratory Study of Young Urban Males
Preview not available

Abstract

The self-reported sexual and parenting behaviors and attitudes of 42 urban males aged 16-22 who had fathered a child were compared with those of 49 demographically similar young men who were not fathers when they sought medical care at a public health center. Use of a questionnaire and structured interviews established that both groups had similar levels of self-esteem and similar ages at first intercourse. Fathers were less likely than the other respondents to feel that parenthood would interfere with their future (71% vs. 92%) or to have a concrete five-year plan (57% vs. 90%). They were more likely to believe that family (62% vs. 37%) and peers (68% vs. 40%) looked favorably upon early parenthood, to have a mother who was a teenage parent (74% vs. 47%) and to state that they lacked an adequate father figure while growing up (50% vs. 18%). Fathers also reported more frequent sexual activity and less consistent contraceptive use than did the others.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
280
    280
  • Thumbnail: Page 
281
    281
  • Thumbnail: Page 
282
    282
  • Thumbnail: Page 
283
    283