Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Probability of Clonal Identity: Inferring the Relative Success of Sexual Versus Clonal Reproduction from Spatial Genetic Patterns

Yuko Harada, Shoichi Kawano and Yoh Iwasa
Journal of Ecology
Vol. 85, No. 5 (Oct., 1997), pp. 591-600
DOI: 10.2307/2960530
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2960530
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Probability of Clonal Identity: Inferring the Relative Success of Sexual Versus Clonal Reproduction from Spatial Genetic Patterns
Preview not available

Abstract

1 For terrestrial plants capable of both vegetative propagation and sexual seed production, we can distinguish clones from the spatial genetic pattern of plants using multi-locus measurement of allozymes, or other molecular markers. 2 The probability of clonal identity F(r) is defined as the probability that a randomly chosen pair of plants separated by a distance r belong to the same clone. It can be estimated from spatial genetic patterns of plants determined by multi-locus molecular methods. 3 If genotypes have the same competitive ability (no local adaptation), diffusion approximation shows that the equilibrium clonal identity function F(r) is proportional to $\exp\lbrack -cr\rbrack/\sqrt{r}$. 4 The exponential rate of decline with distance, c, equals $\sqrt{(2u/\nu\sigma^2)}$, and is determined by the relative success of sexual vs. vegetative reproduction (u/ν) and the mean square parent-offspring distance in successful vegetative propagation (σ2). 5 We carried out computer simulations to confirm the usefulness of this formula in inferring demographic processes from spatial genetic data. The results hold irrespective of the dispersal range of sexual seeds. The integral of the probability of clonal identity is closely related to the average clone size.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[591]
    [591]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
592
    592
  • Thumbnail: Page 
593
    593
  • Thumbnail: Page 
594
    594
  • Thumbnail: Page 
595
    595
  • Thumbnail: Page 
596
    596
  • Thumbnail: Page 
597
    597
  • Thumbnail: Page 
598
    598
  • Thumbnail: Page 
599
    599
  • Thumbnail: Page 
600
    600