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Outcomes of School Desegregation: Findings from Longitudinal Research

William T. Trent
The Journal of Negro Education
Vol. 66, No. 3, The Role of Social Science in School Desegregation Efforts: The St. Louis Example (Summer, 1997), pp. 255-257
DOI: 10.2307/2967164
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2967164
Page Count: 3
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Outcomes of School Desegregation: Findings from Longitudinal Research
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Abstract

This report, derived from the report Trent submitted to the court in the Liddell case and his testimony on March 19, 1996, looks at some important noncognitive outcomes of school desegregation. It is based on his analyses of national survey data including the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972-Employer Survey, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Labor Force Participation-1979 cohort, and the National Survey of 1980 High School Sophomores and Seniors. Trent points out that these national longitudinal survey data show that desegregated schooling has a positive, statistically significant benefit for Black students' later earnings and occupational attainment.

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