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The Crime of Punishment: Racial and Gender Disparities in the use of Corporal Punishment in U.S. Public Schools

James F. Gregory
The Journal of Negro Education
Vol. 64, No. 4 (Autumn, 1995), pp. 454-462
DOI: 10.2307/2967267
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2967267
Page Count: 9
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The Crime of Punishment: Racial and Gender Disparities in the use of Corporal Punishment in U.S. Public Schools
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Abstract

Anecdotal evidence has long suggested that boys in general and African American males in particular are disproportionately represented among students who receive corporal punishment (CP) in school. Until 1994, no national data disaggregated by race and gender were available to determine if African American boys are indeed subjected to physical discipline at excessive rates. This study provides the first analysis of such race/gender-disaggregated data; it also lamentably confirms the popular belief. The incidence of African American males receiving CP was found to be extremely high, as was the likelihood ratio comparing Black male students' CP rates to those for other race/gender cohorts, especially White females. Limitations of the data set and implications of the findings are discussed.

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