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What Causes Cryptogenic Fibrosing Alveolitis? A Case-Control Study Of Environmental Exposure To Dust

Jonathan Scott, Ian Johnston and John Britton
BMJ: British Medical Journal
Vol. 301, No. 6759 (Nov. 3, 1990), pp. 1015-1017
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/29709411
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
What Causes Cryptogenic Fibrosing Alveolitis? A Case-Control Study Of Environmental Exposure To Dust
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Abstract

Objective—To investigate the role of occupational and domestic exposure to dust in the aetiology of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis. Design—Matched case-control study. Subjects—40 Patients with cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis and 106 community controls matched for age and sex who responded to a questionnaire. Main outcome measure—Responses to self administered questionnaire asking about lifetime exposure to dust, animals, and smoke at home and at work. Results—The patients with cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis were more likely to report occupational exposure to metal dust (matched odds ratio 10.97 (95% confidence interval 2.30 to 52.4), p<0.001) or wood dust (2.94 (0.87 to 9.90), p=0.08), to have worked with cattle (10.89 (1.24 to 96.0), p=0.01), and to have lived in a house heated by a wood fire (12.55 (1.04 to 114), p=0.009). A history of smoking and social class based on occupation were not significantly related to disease state. Conclusion—Environmental exposure to dust may be an important factor in the aetiology of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis.

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