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Journal Article

The Analgesic Effect Of Sucrose In Full Term Infants: A Randomised Controlled Trial

Nora Haouari, Christopher Wood, Gillian Griffiths and Malcolm Levene
BMJ: British Medical Journal
Vol. 310, No. 6993 (Jun. 10, 1995), pp. 1498-1500
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/29727543
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Analgesic Effect Of Sucrose In Full Term Infants: A Randomised Controlled Trial
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of different sucrose concentrations on measures of neonatal pain. Design—Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial of sterile water (control) or one of three solutions of sucrose—namely, 12.5%, 25%, and 50% wt/vol. Setting—Postnatal ward. Patients—60 healthy infants of gestational age 37-42 weeks and postnatal age 1-6 days randomised to receive 2 ml of one of the four solutions on to the tongue two minutes before heel prick sampling for serum bilirubin concentrations. Main outcome measure—Duration of crying over the first three minutes after heel prick. Results—There was a significant reduction in overall crying time and heart rate after three minutes in the babies given 50% sucrose as compared with controls. This was maximal one minute after heel prick in the 50% sucrose group and became statistically significant in the 25% sucrose group at two minutes. There was a significant trend for a reduction in crying time with increasing concentrations of sucrose over the first three minutes. Conclusion—Concentrated sucrose solution seems to reduce crying and the autonomic effects of a painful procedure in healthy normal babies. Sucrose may be a useful and safe analgesic for minor procedures in neonates.

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