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Comparison Of Immunodeficiency And AIDS Defining Conditions In HIV Negative And HIV Postive Men With Haemophilia A

Caroline A. Sabin, K. John Pasi, Andrew N. Phillips, Patricia Lilley, Margarita Bofill, Christine A. Lee and Peter Duesberg
BMJ: British Medical Journal
Vol. 312, No. 7025 (Jan. 27, 1996), pp. 207-212
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/29730442
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Comparison Of Immunodeficiency And AIDS Defining Conditions In HIV Negative And HIV Postive Men With Haemophilia A
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Abstract

Objective—To investigate the hypothesis that high usage of clotting factor concentrate, rather than HIV infection, is the cause of immunodeficiency and AIDS in men with haemophilia. Design—A comparison of AIDS defining conditions and CD4 counts in HIV positive and HIV negative patients with haemophilia matched for usage of clotting factor concentrate. Setting—A comprehensive care haemophilia centre. Subjects—17 HIV positive and 17 HIV negative male patients with haemophilia A (age range 12-60 at beginning of study period) who had received similar amounts of clotting factor concentrate yearly over the years 1980-90. Main outcome measures—Clinical events listed as AIDS defining in the Centers for Disease Control AIDS definition; CD4 lymphocyte counts; death. Results—Of 108 HIV positive male patients with haemophilia A, only 17 could be matched to an HIV negative patient. This was due to the much higher average usage of factor VIII in the HIV positive group. Between 1980 and 1990, 16 clinical events occurred in nine of the 17 HIV positive patients. No event occurred in the 17 HIV negative patients. In each pair the mean CD4 count during follow up was, on average, 0.5×10⁹/l lower in the HIV positive patient. Conclusion—These data reject the hypothesis that high usage of clotting factor concentrate, rather than HIV infection, is the cause of immunodeficiency and AIDS in men with haemophilia.

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