Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Occupation and Risk of Lung Cancer in Central and Eastern Europe: The IARC Multi-Center Case-Control Study

Alicja Bardin-Mikolajczak, Jolanta Lissowska, David Zaridze, Neonila Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Peter Rudnai, Eleonora Fabianova, Dana Mates, Marie Navratilova, Vladimir Bencko, Vladimir Janout, Joelle Fevotte, Tony Fletcher, Andrea't Mannetje, Paul Brennan and Paolo Boffetta
Cancer Causes & Control
Vol. 18, No. 6 (Aug., 2007), pp. 645-654
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/29736667
Page Count: 10
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
Occupation and Risk of Lung Cancer in Central and Eastern Europe: The IARC Multi-Center Case-Control Study
Preview not available

Abstract

Objective We sought to evaluate the role of occupation and industry in lung carcinogenesis in six countries in Central and Eastern Europe. Methods This multi-center case-control study included 2,056 male and 576 female lung cancer incidence cases diagnosed from 1998 to 2001 and 2,144 male and 727 female controls frequency-matched for sex and age. Unconditional regression models were applied to calculate the odds ratios after controlling for potential confounders including age (5-year groups), study center (15 centers), and tobacco pack-years. Results Elevated odds ratios (ORs) were found for men employed as production workers (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.22-1.72), bookkeepers and cashiers (1.81, 1.03-3.24), general farmers (1.67, 1.08-2.60), livestock workers (2.54, 1.09-5.88), miners (2.17, 1.47-3.23), toolmakers and metal patternmakers (2.56, 1.34-4.94), glass formers (2.55, 1.18-5.50), dockworkers, and freight handlers (1.49, 1.04-2.12). Industries with elevated risk among men included mining (1.75, 1.20-2.57), manufacture of cement, lime, or plaster (3.62, 1.11-12.00), casting of metals (2.00, 1.17-3.45), manufacture of electric motors (2.18, 1.24-3.86). For women, elevated ORs were found for medical, dental, veterinary doctors (2.54, 1.01-6.31), librarians and curators (7.03, 1.80-27.80), sewers 3.63 (1.12-10.23). Conclusions This study identifies new areas for further, explanatory analyses, especially in production work, and indicates new possible sources of exposure to cancer risk for women.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[645]
    [645]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
646
    646
  • Thumbnail: Page 
647
    647
  • Thumbnail: Page 
648
    648
  • Thumbnail: Page 
649
    649
  • Thumbnail: Page 
650
    650
  • Thumbnail: Page 
651
    651
  • Thumbnail: Page 
652
    652
  • Thumbnail: Page 
653
    653
  • Thumbnail: Page 
654
    654