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Differential Vulnerability and Psychological Health in Unemployment

Paul R. Jackson
Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series D (The Statistician)
Vol. 34, No. 1, Statistics in Health (1985), pp. 83-91
Published by: Wiley for the Royal Statistical Society
DOI: 10.2307/2987506
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2987506
Page Count: 9
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Differential Vulnerability and Psychological Health in Unemployment
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Abstract

This paper draws together some of the results of two large scale studies of psychological health and unemployment in the UK. These studies show that declines in psychological health are associated with unemployment; and that such declines are most plausibly seen as a consequence of unemployment rather than a cause of it. In addition, specific sub-groups of individuals are defined who are affected more by unemployment. The first study, of two cohorts of school leavers from 12 schools in a single city, showed changes in psychological health following changes in employment status, with no differences present before entry into the labour market. Larger changes in health were found for those individuals with high commitment to the employment role. The second study, a longitudinal study of men drawn from all ages within the adult labour market, showed an association between duration of unemployment and psychological ill-health for specific sub-groups within the total sample.

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