Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Breaking Misconceptions-Statistics and Its Relationship to Mathematics

David J. Hand
Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series D (The Statistician)
Vol. 47, No. 2 (1998), pp. 245-250
Published by: Wiley for the Royal Statistical Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2988665
Page Count: 6
  • Get Access
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($29.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Breaking Misconceptions-Statistics and Its Relationship to Mathematics
Preview not available

Abstract

Statistics is about solving real problems. An undue emphasis on its mathematical foundations is detrimental to the discipline--it leads to restrictions on its perceived value so that statisticians and those who might otherwise benefit from its methods lose out. Although mathematics lies at its core, statistics as a discipline involves several essential components beyond mathematics. Notably among these are an appreciation of the concepts and methods of the area to which statistical techniques are being applied and computational skills. The range of potential applications of statistical ideas is vast-and is growing. It is important that the discipline of statistics should not let itself be marginalized by an apparent obsession with mathematical niceties.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[245]
    [245]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
246
    246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
247
    247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
248
    248
  • Thumbnail: Page 
249
    249
  • Thumbnail: Page 
250
    250