Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Is Medicaid Pronatalist? The Effect of Eligibility Expansions on Abortions and Births

Theodore Joyce, Robert Kaestner and Florence Kwan
Family Planning Perspectives
Vol. 30, No. 3 (May - Jun., 1998), pp. 108-113+127
Published by: Guttmacher Institute
DOI: 10.2307/2991623
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2991623
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($29.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Is Medicaid Pronatalist? The Effect of Eligibility Expansions on Abortions and Births
Preview not available

Abstract

Context: Income thresholds for Medicaid eligibility for pregnant women were raised in two phases between 1987 and 1991. During roughly the same period, the U.S. fertility rate rose and the abortion rate declined; changes were particularly marked among young women, raising the possibility that fertility increases were related to Medicaid expansions. Methods: Pooled time-series cross-section regressions were used to examine the effects of the Medicaid eligibility expansions in 15 states on rates of abortions and births among unmarried women aged 19-27 with 12 or fewer years of schooling. Abortion data came from the National Center for Health Statistics or state health departments and were aggregated by women's age, race, marital status and schooling; data on births were from national natality tapes. Results: The Medicaid expansions were associated with a 5% increase in the birthrate among white women, but did not influence the rate among black women. Overall, no effect on the abortion rate was evident, but in analyses restricted to a subsample of eight states with the most complete abortion data, the rate among white women showed a significant decline after the second phase of expansions. Conclusions: Subsidized health care for low-income pregnant women in these 15 states may have encouraged white women to have more children than they would have without coverage.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
127
    127