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Partner-Specific Sexual Behaviors Among Persons with Both Main and Other Partners

Amy Lansky, James C. Thomas and Jo Anne Earp
Family Planning Perspectives
Vol. 30, No. 2 (Mar. - Apr., 1998), pp. 93-96
Published by: Guttmacher Institute
DOI: 10.2307/2991666
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2991666
Page Count: 4
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Partner-Specific Sexual Behaviors Among Persons with Both Main and Other Partners
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Abstract

Context: If men and women engage in different sexual behavior with main partners than with other types of partners, then programs aimed at preventing the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) may need to address individuals' differential risk with each partner type.Methods: Relationship characteristics, partner risk behaviors and sexual behaviors are examined among 123 male and 106 female STD clinic patients who had both main and other partners. Individual-level comparisons are made for two types of partner pairs: main vs. other frequent (side) partners and main vs. casual partners.Results: Among men and women with both main and side partners, the proportion who had known only their main partner for at least a year (48% of men and 41% of women) was significantly higher than the proportion who had known only their side partner for that long (2% and 9%, respectively); no other variable differed significantly by partner type. Among those with main and casual partners, both men and women were more likely to use alcohol or drugs before or during sex with main partners only (15%) than with casual partners only (1-3%). Women with main and casual partners were more likely to have oral sex only with main partners than only with casual partners (37% vs. 3%), and were more likely to use condoms only with casual partners than only with main partners (33% vs. 4%). Conclusions: Providers need to ask individuals about their sexual behaviors with different partner types, and should tailor prevention messages to an individual's risks and reproductive intentions with each partner.

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