Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Reconfiguring Pluralism: Identity and Institutions in the Inegalitarian Polity

Susan Bickford
American Journal of Political Science
Vol. 43, No. 1 (Jan., 1999), pp. 86-108
DOI: 10.2307/2991786
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2991786
Page Count: 23
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Reconfiguring Pluralism: Identity and Institutions in the Inegalitarian Polity
Preview not available

Abstract

This essay brings together two contemporary literatures: theories of pluralism that focus our attention on inequality between groups and theories of identity that emphasize its multiple and constructed character. I use these debates to construct a lens through which to analyze the institutional representation of disadvantaged groups. Group identity is orchestrated and produced in part through political institutional processes; thus attempts at democratic reform have to address normative questions about what forms of citizenship should be produced and enabled by representative institutions. I argue that representative reforms must take into account multiple forms of political collectivity and provide political space for citizens to deliberate about the effects of social structures on their lives and identities. Democratic theorists cannot treat group identity as fixed, but neither can we dismiss "identity politics." Guinier's (1994) model enables a multiple and variegated citizen identity, encourages coalitions between groups, and has the potential to engender citizen action beyond the electoral moment.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[86]
    [86]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108