Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Accessibility and the Political Utility of Partisan and Ideological Orientations

Robert Huckfeldt, Jeffrey Levine, William Morgan and John Sprague
American Journal of Political Science
Vol. 43, No. 3 (Jul., 1999), pp. 888-911
DOI: 10.2307/2991839
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2991839
Page Count: 24
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Accessibility and the Political Utility of Partisan and Ideological Orientations
Preview not available

Abstract

We examine the accessibility of ideological and partisan orientations as factors affecting the political capacity of citizens. In particular, is the utility of partisan and ideological reasoning contingent on the accessibility of an individual's own self-identifications? Are people with accessible points of ideological and partisan orientation more likely to invoke these orientations in formulating political judgments and resisting efforts at political persuasion? Are they more likely to demonstrate politically compatible points of orientation? These questions are addressed in the context of a study conducted during the course of the 1996 election campaign. In order to measure the accessibility of respondents' partisan and ideological self-identifications, we record response latencies--the time required for respondents to answer particular questions. Based on our analysis, we argue that attitudes and self identifications are useful heuristic devices that allow individuals to make sense out of the complexity and chaos of politics. But some citizens are better able than others to employ these devices, and by demonstrating who these citizens are, the concept of accessibility becomes an important element in the explanation of political capacity.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[888]
    [888]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
889
    889
  • Thumbnail: Page 
890
    890
  • Thumbnail: Page 
891
    891
  • Thumbnail: Page 
892
    892
  • Thumbnail: Page 
893
    893
  • Thumbnail: Page 
894
    894
  • Thumbnail: Page 
895
    895
  • Thumbnail: Page 
896
    896
  • Thumbnail: Page 
897
    897
  • Thumbnail: Page 
898
    898
  • Thumbnail: Page 
899
    899
  • Thumbnail: Page 
900
    900
  • Thumbnail: Page 
901
    901
  • Thumbnail: Page 
902
    902
  • Thumbnail: Page 
903
    903
  • Thumbnail: Page 
904
    904
  • Thumbnail: Page 
905
    905
  • Thumbnail: Page 
906
    906
  • Thumbnail: Page 
907
    907
  • Thumbnail: Page 
908
    908
  • Thumbnail: Page 
909
    909
  • Thumbnail: Page 
910
    910
  • Thumbnail: Page 
911
    911