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Sexual Activity and Condom Use in Lusaka, Zambia

Sohail Agha
International Family Planning Perspectives
Vol. 24, No. 1 (Mar., 1998), pp. 32-37
Published by: Guttmacher Institute
DOI: 10.2307/2991917
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2991917
Page Count: 6
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Sexual Activity and Condom Use in Lusaka, Zambia
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Abstract

Context: Condom social marketing is among the AIDS prevention strategies being attempted in Lusaka, Zambia, a country where women generally are of low socioeconomic status relative to men, and where the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases is high. Methods: The 1996 Lusaka Sexual Behavior and Condom Use Survey gathered data on sexual activity in Lusaka from 806 respondents; multiple regression analysis was performed to identify factors that predicted men's and women's condom use. Results: Most respondents reported that their most recent intercourse was with their marital partner (62% of women and 43% of men) or with a regular partner (20% of women and 23% of men); almost one-quarter of men (24%), however, reported having last had intercourse with a casual partner. Overall, 17% of women and 24% of men had used a condom at last intercourse. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that women whose last intercourse was with a regular or casual partner rather than a marital partner were significantly more likely (odds ratios, 2.8 and 3.1, respectively) to have used a condom, as were those who recalled hearing a social marketing advertising message for condoms (2.8). For men, use of condoms was elevated among those who were younger than 30 (odds ratios, 3.3-3.8), who had an education beyond the secondary level (2.2) and who had easy access to condoms (1.9). Conclusions: Because of gender inequity, programs directed at men are more likely to succeed in encouraging condom use than are those aimed at developing women's skills in negotiating condom use.

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