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Characterization of Somatic Embryo Development and Plant Regeneration from Friable Maize Callus Cultures

John W. McCain, Kathryn K. Kamo and Thomas K. Hodges
Botanical Gazette
Vol. 149, No. 1 (Mar., 1988), pp. 16-20
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2995415
Page Count: 5
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Characterization of Somatic Embryo Development and Plant Regeneration from Friable Maize Callus Cultures
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Abstract

Friable, rapidly growing callus was produced from immature embryos of maize (Zea mays) inbred A188 and hybrids A188 x B73 and B73 x A188. The callus consisted of nodules with active superficial cell layers that produced new nodules and regenerated numerous plantlets by somatic embryogenesis. Early stages of somatic embryo development, observed in paraffin and plastic sections, indicated probable single-cell origin of the somatic embryos. Three genotypes of friable callus had somatic embryos of identical anatomy, although hybrids A188 x B73 and B73 x A188 regenerated more plants than inbred A188 after 6-9 mo in culture. Selection and subculturing of embryogenic regions of the friable callus greatly increased the plant regeneration capacity of the cultures.

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