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The Developmental Morphology of Leea guineensis. II. Floral Development

Jean M. Gerrath, Christian R. Lacroix and Usher Posluszny
Botanical Gazette
Vol. 151, No. 2 (Jun., 1990), pp. 210-220
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2995458
Page Count: 11
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The Developmental Morphology of Leea guineensis. II. Floral Development
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Abstract

The floral development of Leea guineensis G. Don is described, using three-dimensional and histological observations. Inflorescences may be terminal or axillary. Axillary inflorescences, however, arise only in the axil of the uppermost leaf on the shoot in conjunction with a terminal inflorescence. Inflorescence branches are initiated spirally and are preceded by the formation of subtending bracts. Subsequent orders of branches arise as pairs of primordia, each at 90⚬ from the previous pair. The ultimate inflorescence pattern is a compound dichasium. Flowers are pentamerous. Sepals arise spirally. Petals arise simultaneously, alternate with the sepals, and are cucullate, valvate, and reflexed at anthesis. Stamens are petal-opposed. The anthers are connivent and hook over the floral disc prior to anthesis. At anthesis the anthers are reflexed and may appear extrorse. Pollen is tricolporate. The gynoecium arises as a ring primordium, from which three units are formed as the result of inward growth of three primary septa from the gynoecial wall. Two ovules form at the base of the septum of each unit, and subsequently three secondary septa form, effectively forming six locules at maturity. Ovules are bitegmic, anatropous, and crassinucellate. The ovary is half-inferior at maturity. Flowers are markedly protandrous. Fruits were not formed in the material observed.

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