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A Vegetation-Landform Classification of Forest Sites Within the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina

Steven M. Jones, David H. van Lear and Silas K. Cox
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club
Vol. 111, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1984), pp. 349-360
Published by: Torrey Botanical Society
DOI: 10.2307/2995916
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2995916
Page Count: 12
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A Vegetation-Landform Classification of Forest Sites Within the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina
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Abstract

Forest community types were identified and described on the 78,000 ha Savannah River Plant property, located within the upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Stands were separated using a combination of detrended correspondence analysis and cluster analysis Eight hardwood community types were identified along an interpreted environmental gradient correlated with changing topographic position Soil-site conditions ranged from xeric, thick-sand uplands to flooded bottoms Pine stands were classified into twelve community types occurring on all landforms except wet flats and swamps across the environmental gradient Characteristic species were identified through synthesis table construction One to several pine or shade intolerant hardwood community types and a near stable or stable hardwood community type were associated with each site Classifying sites, site types, and identifying associated seral communities is similar to the habitat type approach as used in the western United States The feasibility of using a habitat type approach within the eastern United States despite the absence of climax vegetation is demonstrated.

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