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The Vascular Flora of Granite Outcrops in the Central Mineral Region of Texas

Terrence W. Walters and Robert Wyatt
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club
Vol. 109, No. 3 (Jul. - Sep., 1982), pp. 344-364
Published by: Torrey Botanical Society
DOI: 10.2307/2995981
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2995981
Page Count: 21
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The Vascular Flora of Granite Outcrops in the Central Mineral Region of Texas
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Abstract

The vascular flora of granite outcrops in the Central Mineral Region of Texas includes 381 species in 255 genera and 88 families. Approximately 40% of the species belong to five families: Poaceae (56), Asteraceae (39), Cyperaceae (19), Fabaceae (18), and Polypodiaceae (15). Thirty-four families and 189 genera are represented by one species. The 23 species characteristic of granite outcrops display five distribution patterns: endemic, near-endemic, eastern, western, and wide-spread. A comparison of the granite outcrop floras of central Texas and the southeastern United States shows relatively few genera and species common to both regions; however, the life-form spectra are essentially identical. Drought-adapted therophytes and hemicryptophytes are dominant in both regions. This suggests that granite outcrops provide similar types of microenvironments despite major differences in the climate and surrounding vegetation of each region. The much higher proportion of endemics among the characteristic plants of granite outcrops in the Southeast (17) versus Texas (4) reflects a greater degree of geographical isolation and sharper discontinuity with the surrounding vegetation.

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