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Population Structure and Spatial Pattern of Two Coastal Populations of Ocala Sand Pine (Pinus clausa (Chapm. ex Engelm.) Vasey ex Sarg. var. clausa D. B. Ward)

Kathleen C. Parker, Albert J. Parker, R. Matthew Beaty, Mark M. Fuller and Timothy D. Faust
The Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society
Vol. 124, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1997), pp. 22-33
Published by: Torrey Botanical Society
DOI: 10.2307/2996595
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2996595
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Population Structure and Spatial Pattern of Two Coastal Populations of Ocala Sand Pine (Pinus clausa (Chapm. ex Engelm.) Vasey ex Sarg. var. clausa D. B. Ward)
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Abstract

Two coastal populations of Ocala sand pine (Pinus clausa (Chapm. ex Engelm.) Vasey ex Sarg. var. clausa D. B. Ward) in southeastern Florida were compared for effects of disturbances occurring at different scales on spatial dispersion and age structure. Fire has been excluded from the older population (JDO) since at least 1947; the younger population (JDY) experienced a wildfire in 1971. The two populations differed markedly in size and age structure and spatial dispersion. Density was greater and basal area was lower in JDY than in JDO. Ages in JDY were bimodally distributed, with a primary peak from 11-20 years old (delayed recruitment after the 1971 fire) and a secondary peak from 41-45 years old (earlier post-fire recruits that survived the 1971 fire). Stems in JDY were aggregated, with a positive association between seedlings and small trees. JDO had experienced more wind damage, heart rot, and mortality than JDY. Ages were unimodally distributed in JDO, with the peak from 61-70 years old; and stem distribution was random to regular. Although others have reported regeneration in canopy gaps in senescent Ocala sand pine populations in the absence of fire, JDO has shown no recruitment since 1950. With continued fire suppression and mortality of sand pine in JDO, xeric hardwoods in the understory will likely become increasingly dominant.

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