Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Pollen Evidence of Late Holocene Mangrove Development in Bermuda

Joanna C. Ellison
Global Ecology and Biogeography Letters
Vol. 5, No. 6 (Nov., 1996), pp. 315-326
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/2997587
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2997587
Page Count: 12
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Pollen Evidence of Late Holocene Mangrove Development in Bermuda
Preview not available

Abstract

Bermuda is the northern latitudinal limit for mangroves, but communities are diverse and productive. Two pollen diagrams from the largest mangrove area show vegetation changes over the last 5000 years. From 5000 to 2100 years ago this was a marsh wetland, and pollen evidence is also shown of the dryland endemic forest before colonisation of Bermuda. Establishment of mangroves has only occurred in the last 3000 years, when sea-level rise slowed from 26 to 7 cm/100 years. Flotation experiments indicate that propagules could readily colonize from the Caribbean, and evidence both of cooler climate during the glacial and that none of Bermuda's many endemics utilize a mangrove habitat suggests that mangroves have had discontinuous presence in Bermuda through the Late Pleistocene. This study shows that mangrove ranges may be more plastic than was previously thought, subject to availability of habitats rather than dispersal capability.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
315
    315
  • Thumbnail: Page 
316
    316
  • Thumbnail: Page 
317
    317
  • Thumbnail: Page 
318
    318
  • Thumbnail: Page 
319
    319
  • Thumbnail: Page 
320
    320
  • Thumbnail: Page 
321
    321
  • Thumbnail: Page 
322
    322
  • Thumbnail: Page 
323
    323
  • Thumbnail: Page 
324
    324
  • Thumbnail: Page 
325
    325
  • Thumbnail: Page 
326
    326