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Protection of Floristic Diversity in New Caledonia

J. M. Veillon
Biodiversity Letters
Vol. 1, No. 3/4, New Caledonia: A Case Study in Biodiversity (May - Jul., 1993), pp. 88-91
Published by: Wiley
DOI: 10.2307/2999752
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2999752
Page Count: 4
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Protection of Floristic Diversity in New Caledonia
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Abstract

In New Caledonia, protected areas exist only on Grande Terre (mainly in the south of the main island, 16,500 km2) These land areas have been created either for their wealth of endemic plants, for their fauna, or to meet the needs of the population (protection of water supplies, tourist sites) Whatever their aims, in practice they protect only two types of plant formation: evergreen forest and maquis on ultrabasic substrates (South), covering only about 9% of the total area This low percentage makes it necessary to (a) increase the surface protected for the formations involved; (b) create protection zones urgently in the following formations not yet covered: mangrove, evergreen forest on schists and on limestone (Loyalty Islands) and sclerophyll forest; and (c) list the species exhibiting disjunct distributions and institute measures to protect their sites

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