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Increasing the Supply of Providers for the Medically Underserved: Marketing and Public Policy Issues

Debra L. Scammon, Lawrence B. Li and Scott D. Williams
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
Vol. 14, No. 1 (Spring, 1995), pp. 35-47
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30000377
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Increasing the Supply of Providers for the Medically Underserved: Marketing and Public Policy Issues
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Abstract

Lack of access to health care by those medically underserved results from a complex of social and economic factors. Solutions to the problem will require, at a minimum, removal of financial barriers and assurance of availability of qualified providers. The authors examine public policies designed to impact the supply and training of health care providers in terms of their short- and long-term effectiveness in influencing the composition of the health care workforce. They analyze data from a series of qualitative studies with family practice residents, providers, and key personnel from family practice residency programs for insights to help identify candidates who could be successful in needy environments, and in understanding providers' perceptions of benefits and drawbacks of working with the underserved. The authors recommend a strategy for recruiting candidates better matched to the requirements of practice with the underserved, revising curricula to provide needed training to facilitate providers' success in underserved settings, and designing practice environments supportive of providers working with underserved populations.

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