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The 70% Majority: Enduring Consumer Beliefs about Advertising

John E. Calfee and Debra Jones Ringold
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
Vol. 13, No. 2 (Fall, 1994), pp. 228-238
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30000398
Page Count: 11
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The 70% Majority: Enduring Consumer Beliefs about Advertising
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Abstract

Six decades of survey data consistently indicate that about 70% of consumers think that advertising is often untruthful, it seeks to persuade people to buy things they do not want, it should be more strictly regulated, and it nonetheless provides valuable information. Consumers also tend to find that advertising's benefits outweigh its deficits. These beliefs have remained remarkably stable despite large fluctuations in the scope and vigor of advertising regulation.

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