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Some Lessons Learned from FTC v. Staples

Kent B. Monroe
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
Vol. 18, No. 1, Pricing and Public Policy (Spring, 1999), pp. 22-24
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30000505
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Some Lessons Learned from FTC v. Staples
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Abstract

In this article, the author briefly reviews four substantive issues in the analysis of the effects of the proposed merger of office superstores Staples and Office Depot. One apparent issue in FTC v. Staples was the availability of relevant information to support the claims of the merging firms and the appropriate methods of analyzing the information. To manage prices effectively requires the collection, analysis, and dissemination to decision makers of relevant information. The author provides a prescription for the minimum information that firms should collect and place in a pricing information system as simply good managerial practice.

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