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The Stratigraphy of the Upper Palaeozoic Rocks of the Lyons Hill Area, County Kildare

P. Strogen and I. D. Somerville
Irish Journal of Earth Sciences
Vol. 6, No. 2 (1984), pp. 155-173
Published by: Royal Irish Academy
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30002470
Page Count: 19
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Stratigraphy of the Upper Palaeozoic Rocks of the Lyons Hill Area, County Kildare
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Abstract

The Upper Palaeozoic succession for the Lyons Hill ("Wheatfield") area has been determined from a series of boreholes and extends, with minor gaps, from the Silurian and "Old Red Sandstone" into the Lower Carboniferous. A new formation, the Lyons Hill Dolomite Formation is proposed, which together with the Waulsortian Limestones above, replaces the Lower Limestone of Jukes and Du Noyer (1860). The Lyons Hill Formation is dominated by dolomitised shallow marine carbonates displaying cyclic shallowing-up sequences. The succession differs from those in County Limerick and adjacent areas ("Limerick Province") and Counties Meath and Westmeath ("North Midlands Province"). A new sub-Waulsortian depositional province is defined ("Kildare Province") covering much of Counties Dublin and Kildare. Waulsortian Limestones, also largely dolomitised, were probably deposited in deeper water and distinct mound forms can be distinguished which possess unusual internal textures. These are succeeded by the Calp which is of deep water turbiditic and mass flow origin. Basinal subsidence rate increased throughout the Lower Carboniferous culminating in faulting rather than flexural downwarping in Viséan times.

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