Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Client Self-Determination: Untangling the Knot

Jack Rothman
Social Service Review
Vol. 63, No. 4 (Dec., 1989), pp. 598-612
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30012053
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Client Self-Determination: Untangling the Knot
Preview not available

Abstract

Client self-determination may be the most confounding concept in the intellectual underpinnings of social work. While self-determination is accorded utmost esteem in the profession, its meaning and application are clouded. A number of existing justifications for self-determination concepts are outlined. However, serious questions have been raised concerning the primacy and efficacy of the self-determination principle from a number of sources. This critique covers four general areas: limitations in client capacity to make choices, external restraints that inhibit choice, other values that may have primacy, and other professional considerations that influence practice behavior. An alternative conceptual perspective is proposed.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[598]
    [598]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
599
    599
  • Thumbnail: Page 
600
    600
  • Thumbnail: Page 
601
    601
  • Thumbnail: Page 
602
    602
  • Thumbnail: Page 
603
    603
  • Thumbnail: Page 
604
    604
  • Thumbnail: Page 
605
    605
  • Thumbnail: Page 
606
    606
  • Thumbnail: Page 
607
    607
  • Thumbnail: Page 
608
    608
  • Thumbnail: Page 
609
    609
  • Thumbnail: Page 
610
    610
  • Thumbnail: Page 
611
    611
  • Thumbnail: Page 
612
    612