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Organizing AIDS Service Consortia: Lead Agency Identity and Consortium Cohesion

John A. Fleishman, Vincent Mor, John D. Piette and Susan M. Allen
Social Service Review
Vol. 66, No. 4 (Dec., 1992), pp. 547-570
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30012486
Page Count: 24
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Organizing AIDS Service Consortia: Lead Agency Identity and Consortium Cohesion
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Abstract

Developing consortia or coalitions of health and social service agencies is commonly advocated as a response to problems of service fragmentation or lack of coordination. In this article, we describe the structure and functioning of consortia established to promote coordinated systems of community-based care for people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in nine communities across the United States. Consortia varied in the nature of the lead agency and in the quality of interorganizational relationships. Although relationships among members were positive at some sites, they were antagonistic, distant, or ambivalent at others. The degree of internal cohesion was related to the identity of the lead agency. Consortia headed by health departments showed more internal cohesion than did consortia headed by hospitals or community-based organizations. The experiences of these consortia highlight issues in planning and organizing networks of service providers.

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