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Name-calling: The Labeling Process in the Social Work Interview

Lois P. Case and Neverlyn B. Lingerfelt
Social Service Review
Vol. 48, No. 1 (Mar., 1974), pp. 75-86
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30015058
Page Count: 12
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Name-calling: The Labeling Process in the Social Work Interview
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Abstract

The use of labels by members of the "helping professions" has been criticized by proponents of societal reaction theory on the basis that labeling plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of deviant behavior. This study examines the relationship between labeling in social work and level of professional education, socioeconomic status of clients, and type of presenting problem. The major hypothesis, that labeling increases with education, was supported, with professionals labeling more than students.

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