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Colonial Legacies and Economic Growth

Robin M. Grier
Public Choice
Vol. 98, No. 3/4 (Jan., 1999), pp. 317-335
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30024490
Page Count: 19
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Colonial Legacies and Economic Growth
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Abstract

Much of the work on colonialism has been theoretical or anecdotal. In this paper, I close the gap between the literature on development and new growth theory by testing the effect of colonization on subsequent growth and development. In a sample of 63 ex-colonial states from 1961-1990, I find that colonies that were held for longer periods of time than other countries tend to perform better, on average, after independence. Finally, I show that the level of education at the time of independence can help to explain much of the development gap between the former British and French colonies in Africa.

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