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Are Politics and Geography Related?: Evidence from a Cross-Section of Capital Cities

Kristof Dascher
Public Choice
Vol. 105, No. 3/4 (2000), pp. 373-392
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30026402
Page Count: 20
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Are Politics and Geography Related?: Evidence from a Cross-Section of Capital Cities
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Abstract

With a few prominent exceptions, a capital city is typically also the biggest city of its country. This might suggest that a capital city is more attractive than other cities because of the capital city function. In the paper, we test this hypothesis by looking at employment growth in a sample of capital cities. Employment growth might indicate outmigration from the political hinterland and immigration into the capital city. Specifically, we look at a sample of regional capitals that consists of West-German county seats. These county seats underwent reform in the late sixties and early seventies. In this sample, we can reject the idea that the county capital role does not have a positive influence on local employment growth.

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