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Procession and Possession in Glastonbury: Continuity, Change and the Manipulation of Tradition

Marion Bowman
Folklore
Vol. 115, No. 3 (Dec., 2004), pp. 273-285
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30035212
Page Count: 13
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Procession and Possession in Glastonbury: Continuity, Change and the Manipulation of Tradition
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Abstract

Glastonbury, a small town in the south-west of England, is considered significant by a variety of religious groups and spiritual seekers. While there is a large degree of peaceful co-existence between people holding radically different worldviews, the contested nature of Glastonbury as a spiritual centre is occasionally played out by means of public displays of religiosity, the most obvious example of which is the procession. This paper compares Christian and Goddess-oriented processions as case studies in the use of traditional means to assert historical, spatial and spiritual claims in contemporary Glastonbury.

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