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Does Chronometry Have a Place in Assessing Math Disorders?

A. Alexander Beaujean, Andrew Knoop and Gregory Holliday
Learning Disability Quarterly
Vol. 29, No. 1 (Winter, 2006), pp. 32-38
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/30035530
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30035530
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Does Chronometry Have a Place in Assessing Math Disorders?
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Abstract

The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if a single math-based chronometric task could accurately discriminate between college students with and without a diagnosed math disorder. Analyzing data from 31 students (6 in the case group, 25 in the clinical comparison group), it was found that the single chronometric task could accurately predict students who did not have a diagnosed math disorder, but not students who had the diagnosis. Moreover, no other non-math psychometric task could add to the predictive power of the chronometric task, indicating that the role of chronometry warrants further study.

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