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The Trojan Horse at the Close of the "Iliad"

George Fredric Franko
The Classical Journal
Vol. 101, No. 2 (Dec. - Jan., 2005/2006), pp. 121-123
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30038644
Page Count: 3
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The Trojan Horse at the Close of the
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Abstract

Homer thrice alludes to the Trojan horse near the Iliad's end: Epeios knocks out an unwary opponent (23.68-91); Priam commands his people to haul lumber into the city without fear of ambush (24.778-9); the poem's final word suggests Troy's inability to survive without Hector hippodamos.

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