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Asylum Recognition Rates in Western Europe: Their Determinants, Variation, and Lack of Convergence

Eric Neumayer
The Journal of Conflict Resolution
Vol. 49, No. 1 (Feb., 2005), pp. 43-66
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30045098
Page Count: 24
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Asylum Recognition Rates in Western Europe: Their Determinants, Variation, and Lack of Convergence
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Abstract

Substantial variation in recognition rates for asylum claims from the same countries of origin subjects refugees to unfair and discriminatory treatment. This article demonstrates the extent of variation and lack of convergence over the period from 1980 to 1999 across Western European destination countries. Refugee interest groups also suspect that political and economic conditions in destination countries, as well as the number of past asylum claims, unduly affect recognition rates. This article estimates the determinants of asylum recognition rates. Origin-specific recognition rates vary, as they should, with the extent of political oppression, human rights violations, interstate armed conflict, and events of genocide and politicide in countries of origin. Recognition rates for the full-protection status are lower only in times of high unemployment in destination countries. Such rates are also lower if many asylum seekers from a country of origin have already applied for asylum in the past.

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