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Inside the Committee That Runs the World

David J. Rothkopf
Foreign Policy
No. 147 (Mar. - Apr., 2005), pp. 30-40
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30047985
Page Count: 11
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Abstract

September 11, 2001, was a catalytic event that revealed the core character of the Bush administration's national security team. As rival factions fought for the president's ear, the transformative ideals espoused by the neocons gained ascendancy-triggering a rift that has split the Republican foreign-policy establishment to its foundations.

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