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The Muslim Face of AIDS

Laura M. Kelley and Nicholas Ebersadt
Foreign Policy
No. 149 (Jul. - Aug., 2005), pp. 42-49
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30048040
Page Count: 7
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Abstract

AIDS does not discriminate by religion or citizenship. Yet, for years, leaders of Muslim countries have denied the pandemic's threat to their societies. While they looked the other way, HIV quietly crept into the most vulnerable populations in the most volatile parts of the world. Muslim leaders must now address the threat-or risk losing their community of believers to a global plague.

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