Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

κ-Casein-Deficient Mice Fail to Lactate

P. Chandra Shekar, Sandeep Goel, S. Deepa Selvi Rani, D. Partha Sarathi, Jomini Liza Alex, Shashi Singh and Satish Kumar
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 103, No. 21 (May 23, 2006), pp. 8000-8005
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30049164
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
κ-Casein-Deficient Mice Fail to Lactate
Preview not available

Abstract

Acquisition of milk production capabilities by an ancestor of mammals is at the root of mammalian evolution. Milk casein micelles are a primary source of amino acids and calcium phosphate to neonates. To understand the role of κ-casein in lactation, we have created and characterized a null mouse strain ($Csnk^{-/-}$) lacking this gene. The mutant κ-casein allele did not affect the expression of other milk proteins in $Csnk^{-/-}$ females. However, these females did not suckle their pups and failed to lactate because of destabilization of the micelles in the lumina of the mammary gland. Thus, κ-casein is essential for lactation and, consequently, for the successful completion of the process of reproduction in mammals. In view of the extreme structural conservation of the casein locus, as well as the phenotype of $Csnk^{-/-}$ females, we propose that the organization of a functional κ-casein gene would have been one of the critical events in the evolution of mammals. Further, κ-casein variants are known to affect the industrial properties of milk in dairy animals. Given the expenses and the time scale of such experiments in livestock species, it is desirable to model the intended genetic modifications in mice first. The mouse strain that we have created would be a useful model to study the effect of κ-casein variants on the properties of milk and/or milk products.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
8000
    8000
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8001
    8001
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8002
    8002
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8003
    8003
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8004
    8004
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8005
    8005