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Vacuolar Invertase Regulates Elongation of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots as Revealed by QTL and Mutant Analysis

Lidiya I. Sergeeva, Joost J. B. Keurentjes, Leónie Bentsink, Jenneke Vonk, Linus H. W. van der Plas, Maarten Koornneef and Dick Vreugdenhil
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 103, No. 8 (Feb. 21, 2006), pp. 2994-2999
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30049527
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Vacuolar Invertase Regulates Elongation of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots as Revealed by QTL and Mutant Analysis
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Abstract

The possible role of the sucrose-splitting enzymes sucrose synthase and invertase in elongating roots and hypocotyls of Arabidopsis was tested by using a combination of histochemical methods and quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. Lengths of roots and hypocotyls correlated better with invertase activities than with sucrose synthase activities. The highest correlations were observed with activities in the elongating zones of roots. The genetic basis of these correlations was studied by using QTL analysis. Several loci, affecting invertase activity, colocated with loci that had an effect on root or hypocotyl length. Further fine mapping of a major locus for root length, but not for hypocotyl length, consistently showed colocation with the locus for invertase activity containing a gene coding for a vacuolar invertase. The analysis of a functional knockout line confirmed the role of this invertase in root elongation, whereas other invertase genes might play a role in hypocotyl elongation. Thus, we show the power of QTL analysis, combined for morphological and biochemical traits, followed by fine-mapping and mutant analysis, in unraveling the function of genes and their role in growth and development.

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