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Admixture Mapping Identifies 8q24 as a Prostate Cancer Risk Locus in African-American Men

Matthew L. Freedman, Christopher A. Haiman, Nick Patterson, Gavin J. McDonald, Arti Tandon, Alicja Waliszewska, Kathryn Penney, Robert G. Steen, Kristin Ardlie, Esther M. John, Ingrid Oakley-Girvan, Alice S. Whittemore, Kathleen A. Cooney, Sue A. Ingles, David Altshuler, Brian E. Henderson and David Reich
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 103, No. 38 (Sep. 19, 2006), pp. 14068-14073
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30051987
Page Count: 6
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Admixture Mapping Identifies 8q24 as a Prostate Cancer Risk Locus in African-American Men
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Abstract

A whole-genome admixture scan in 1,597 African Americans identified a 3.8 Mb interval on chromosome 8q24 as significantly associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer [logarithm of odds (LOD) = 7.1]. The increased risk because of inheriting African ancestry is greater in men diagnosed before 72 years of age (P < 0.00032) and may contribute to the epidemiological observation that the higher risk for prostate cancer in African Americans is greatest in younger men (and attenuates with older age). The same region was recently identified through linkage analysis of prostate cancer, followed by fine-mapping. We strongly replicated this association (P < 4.2 x 10⁻⁹) but find that the previously described alleles do not explain more than a fraction of the admixture signal. Thus, admixture mapping indicates a major, still-unidentified risk gene for prostate cancer at 8q24, motivating intense work to find it.

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