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A Central Regulatory Role for Eosinophils and the Eotaxin/CCR3 Axis in Chronic Experimental Allergic Airway Inflammation

Patricia C. Fulkerson, Christine A. Fischetti, Melissa L. McBride, Lynn M. Hassman, Simon P. Hogan and Marc E. Rothenberg
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 103, No. 44 (Oct. 31, 2006), pp. 16418-16423
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30052173
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Central Regulatory Role for Eosinophils and the Eotaxin/CCR3 Axis in Chronic Experimental Allergic Airway Inflammation
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Abstract

To clarify the role and regulation of eosinophils, we subjected several key eosinophil-related genetically engineered mice to a chronic model of allergic airway inflammation aiming to identify results that were independent of the genetic targeting strategy. In particular, mice with defects in eosinophil development (ΔdblGATA) and eosinophil recruitment [mice deficient in CCR3 (CCR3 knockout) and mice deficient in both eotaxin-1 and eotaxin-2 (eotaxin-1/2 double knockout)] were subjected to Aspergillus fumigatus-induced allergic airway inflammation. Allergen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the airway was abolished by 98%, 94%, and 99% in eotaxin-1/2 double knockout, CCR3 knockout, and Δdbl-GATA mice, respectively. Importantly, allergen-induced type II T helper lymphocyte cytokine production was impaired in the lungs of eosinophil- and CCR3-deficient mice. The absence of eosinophils correlated with reduction in allergen-induced mucus production. Notably, by using global transcript expression profile analysis, a large subset (29%) of allergen-induced genes was eosinophil- and CCR3-dependent; pathways downstream from eosinophils were identified, including in situ activation of coagulation in the lung. In summary, we present multiple lines of independent evidence that eosinophils via CCR3 have a central role in chronic allergic airway disease.

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